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Committing to our own relationships….

Louis Focht reacts after striking out.

Every small business owner knows the feeling of over commitment intimately.  We start a small business so we can have more flexibility to be there for our friends and family, as well as an opportunity to do the work we love.  It sounds so promising…

Then the reality sinks in, and our customers trust us and count on us to solve their problems.  The best ones have our cell phone numbers and can call us anytime.  But sometimes anytime is when we are at our son’s baseball game and he is at bat, or at a zoo field trip with our daughter’s class.  You want to be available for your customers, of course.  Somehow, though, commitments to the people who are always there for us get lost in the shuffle, and we never formally commit to make their events a priority in our lives.

I personally have been at important family events and watched my son roll his eyes at me when I take a call that must be answered.  I have also answered a call I thought might be important and really regretted the disruption when I get stuck in a long, unnecessary conversation.  I saw the disappointment in the face of my son and was missing something I value much more than my business obligation.

As an entrepreneur with little cash flow, you may think you don’t have options for support.  You do, though.  There are business resources right-sized for solopreneurs and small business owners.

You don’t have to do it all yourself, just because you are a small business.  For example, at Just In Time Direction we offer custom phone support packages based on the needs of your business.

It is important as a business owner to continually reevaluate your business model and your life goals.  Small business ownership can be a path of personal development and joy unlike any other, or, if done without reflection, can create a job situation you would never willingly accept.